Beatles Autographs
photographs
Although all areas of Beatles autographed material are immensely popular these days, signed photographs are definitely among the elite of these items. Beatles signed photographs are quite rare, especially of late, as most on the market over the past 15 years have found permanent homes in various collections. It was not at all common for an autograph seeking Beatles fan to have an 8" X 10" photograph readily available when their dream came true and they were face to face with their idols.

As for the photos themselves, there were a few various glossy promotional photographs produced either by Capitol Records or The Beatles' organization for promotional purposes. In addition, there were commercially available photographs used when obtaining their signatures. Not very many authentic signed examples of these photos have been available over the years. Beatles photographs came in a few different basic sizes: 6" X 8", 7" X 9", 8" X 10" (or 10" X 8"). Larger signed photos have surfaced but are extremely rare. These larger photos could be 11" X 14" or even 12" X 15". The value of these larger examples could be as much as 50% more than the same pose signed in 8" X 10" form.

Included in this category, to a lesser degree of value, are signed magazine photos and the like. These can range from a newspaper clipping (least valuable in comparison) to a beautiful full color magazine spread. These can be intact in the publication or cleanly cut out. An added bonus in obtaining a nicely signed photograph of The Beatles is the fact that they were extremely photogenic and they remain, by far the most photographed foursome in history. It's a shame that there weren't more photos signed by the group in their heyday and the resulting rarity is not at all lost on current market values. Signed photos will always be at the top of many a "want list" perched very nearly alongside signed album covers.

PH9. An Original 1961 Beatles Photograph Autographed By The Beatles, With 2 Beatle Drummers!

The Beatles’ popularity grew steadily in Liverpool throughout the year 1961 due to their many concert performances at the famed Cavern Club, which has been dubbed “the birthplace of The Beatles”. In an effort to capture the essence of the band at that time on film, the newly founded ‘Mersey Beat’ newspaper’s photographer Dick Matthews was onsite for a lunchtime performance by The Beatles on December 8, 1961, and snapped a series of images of the Beatles.

Here is one of those shots, an original period print of one of the photos taken on that day by the talented Liverpool photographer - who took some of the earliest photographs of The Beatles. This early promotional photograph measures 8 ½” x 6 ½” and features The Beatles clad in their famous leather pants and jackets, with original drummer Pete Best. Best was replaced by Ringo Starr in August of 1962, and very shortly thereafter this photograph was signed on the reverse in black ballpoint pens by the four Beatles - with Ringo Starr. It is evident that when this photograph was signed by The Beatles, there wasn’t one available to them with the new and current line up, so they used what they at the time.

Adding to the desirability of this autograph set, John Lennon and Paul McCartney have both written “love” before signing, and all four have added “XXX” after their signatures – which is always nice to have. Making this photograph an extremely scarce piece of Beatles memorabilia however, is the fact that Pete Best has also signed it, in the upper right hand corner in blue ballpoint pen - which would fit well into the context of this piece because he is of course represented on the front of the photo. This is a later signature which was obtained by the owner of the photo signed originally by the four Beatles with Ringo. Beatles autograph sets with both drummers are incredibly rare, and this is one of less than a handful that have ever surfaced (thus far the number stands at 3, and this is the only photograph).

This is one of the earliest sets of Beatles autographs with Ringo, autographed by all right after his induction in to the band – and the fact that Pete Best has also signed, thus creating this one of few of known autograph sets with both drummers – makes this something that very few Beatles collectors can brag about having in their collection...$14,000

 

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PH8. All Four Beatles Autographs On The Reverse Side Of An Original Angus McBean Photograph, Signed In Mid-1963

In the Beatles' early years, as manager Brian Epstein crafted their image and spearheaded their publicity machine, it wasn't unusual for the group's schedule to include multiple events in a single day. Monday, January 21, 1963 was one of those days. In the morning alone, they would attend a photo session and make a radio show appearance. As convenience would have it, both would take place at EMI House, 20 Manchester Square, in London.

The photo session was conducted by veteran theater photographer Angus McBean for the purpose of creating some new publicity portraits. McBean took numerous shots of the band against a wall of window blinds and also took several of them peering around a corner in a hallway. However, McBean's most iconic image of the group would be one from a series of photos he also took of the group at EMI House, but at a different session. His indelible shot of The Beatles gazing down from the railings of the EMI house stairwell would be used for the cover of The Beatles' first album, entitled “Please Please Me”.

The radio show that morning would constitute their third appearance on EMI's plug show The Friday Spectacular. The taping, which took place in the ground floor studio at EMI House in front of 100 teenagers, would be later broadcast on Radio Luxembourg. After an interview with hosts Shaw Taylor and Muriel Young, studio recordings of Please Please Me and Ask Me Why were played. Tony Barrow, who would later become The Beatles' press officer, saw this appearance as a turning point -- at least in his opinion of the band -- and proof of their growing popularity and fame. In his sleeve notes for the “Please Please Me” album, Barrow referred to this very appearance:

"It was during the recording of a Radio Luxembourg program in the EMI Friday Spectacular series that I was finally convinced that The Beatles were about to enjoy the type of top-flight national fame which I had always believed that they deserved. The teen-audience didn't know the evening's line-up of artists and groups in advance, and before Muriel Young brought on The Beatles she began to read out their Christian names. She got as far as John ... Paul ... and the rest of her introduction was buried in a mighty barrage of very genuine applause. I cannot think of more than one other group - British or American - which would be so readily identified and welcomed by the announcement of two Christian names. To me, this was the ultimate proof that The Beatles (and not just one or two of their hit records) had arrived at the uncommon peak-popularity point reserved for discdom's privileged few. Shortly afterwards The Beatles proved their pop power when the by-passed the lower segments of the hit parade to scuttle straight into the nation's Top Ten with their second single, “Please Please Me”.

The photo offered here was taken on that momentous January day by Angus McBean and was autographed beautifully on the reverse by all four Beatles, later in the year. Each has written his name legibly and boldly, with John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr using a black ballpoint pen to sign, while Paul McCartney has signed in blue ballpoint. The photo, which measures 10” x 8”, is in excellent condition, with very minor signs of ageing present. The images speak for themselves - this is an exceptional set of autographs on a great photograph that has been very well kept over the past 50 years.

Autographed Beatles photos in any form are becoming increasingly more difficult to obtain. Although this one has been signed on the back, it's a wonderful display piece, an equally prudent investment and a showcase artifact that captures the band in the midst of their inevitable ascent to worldwide acclaim…..$14,000

 
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PH7. 
An Original Peter Kaye Photograph Autographed By The Beatles Just As Ringo Had Joined The Band

In the late 1950s, Liverpool photographer Bill Connell moved his recently-opened Peter Kaye Studio into a three-story, double-fronted shop at 174 Park Road in the Dingle area of town. With Brian Dawe as his assistant and Les Chadwick as his main photographer, Connell ("Peter Kaye") began to make a name for himself around the city doing family portraiture, wedding photography, commercial photography and theatrical sittings. When Bill Harry first launched his Mersey Beat newspaper in 1961, he contacted Les Chadwick at Peter Kaye because he was a close friend of Les' from the Liverpool Art College and was impressed with the photos he'd taken for the college news sheet. Harry's call came with a proposal. In exchange for photo credits, ads in Mersey Beat and a plea to local bands to use the services of Peter Kaye Studios, Chadwick and Connell would take photos commissioned by Mersey Beat. The deal was done.

In 1962, Brian Epstein hired the Peter Kaye Studio to take photos of The Beatles, requesting that Connell "provide photographs that would match the unique Beatles sound".  What resulted were the first publicity photos taken of the band with its new drummer Ringo Starr. In late September 1962, during a one-day outdoor Liverpool shoot, Les Chadwick took some of the most indelible shots of the new Beatles lineup. Among the photos taken were those shot at The Bally (a local dumping ground) on the dock road as well as several shot on Liverpool's Albert Docks, using the cityscape as a backdrop. After the dock photos were done -- amid a steady drizzle -- Chadwick took the group for a session aboard the fire boat The Salvor.

Epstein ordered several hundred copies of the photos taken at this Liverpool "day out" session and demanded to have the prints within two days. Some would be for press use and some would be available to fans. Instead of using a processing house, Connell, Chadwick and Dawes processed the film the hard way, making the prints in-house on very modest equipment. It was a laborious, often frustrating process for the studio, but they ultimately delivered by Brian's deadline. Peter Kaye Studio would soon take some of the best-known shots of The Beatles at the Cavern.

Offered here is an original Les Chadwick photo print of The Beatles aboard The Salvor, taken on that famous day on the Liverpool docks and signed on the reverse side very shortly thereafter by all four Beatles. Each band member has autographed in blue ballpoint pen, except George Harrison, who has signed in black ballpoint. All four have added three "XXX"s (kisses) to their signatures and everyone but George has prefaced his signature with "love". This rare original signed photo, which measures 8” X 6 ”, is not only one of the earliest official images of the final Beatles lineup, but also one of the earliest autograph sets featuring Ringo as a band member. The photo is in fine condition with a few signs of wear and age. The autographs are bold, complete and among the last signed before their signatures began their slow evolution from a crude look to the more familiar fluent style that would develop in 1963. This is a superb example of an investment grade, early Beatles "Ringo" autograph set on the back of one of the most iconic pre-fame images of the group…..$15,000

 
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PH5.  All Four Beatles Autographs Signed In The Spring Of 1963 On The Reverse Side Of An Original Angus McBean Photograph

In the Beatles' early years, as manager Brian Epstein crafted their image and spearheaded their publicity machine, it wasn't unusual for the group's schedule to include multiple events in a single day. Monday, January 21, 1963 was one of those days. In the morning alone, they would attend a photo session and make a radio show appearance. As convenience would have it, both would take place at EMI House, 20 Manchester Square, in London.

The photo session was conducted by veteran theater photographer Angus McBean for the purpose of creating some new publicity portraits. McBean took numerous shots of the band against a wall of window blinds and also took several of them peering around a corner in a hallway. However, McBean's most iconic image of the group would be one from a series of photos he also took of the group at EMI House, but at a different session. His indelible shot of The Beatles gazing down from the railings of the EMI house stairwell would be used for the cover of The Beatles' first album, Please Please Me.

The radio show that morning would constitute their third appearance on EMI's plug show The Friday Spectacular. The taping, which took place in the ground floor studio at EMI House in front of 100 teenagers, would be later broadcast on Radio Luxembourg. After an interview with hosts Shaw Taylor and Muriel Young, studio recordings of Please Please Me and Ask Me Why were played. Tony Barrow, who would later become The Beatles' press officer, saw this appearance as a turning point -- at least in his opinion of the band -- and proof of their growing popularity and fame. In his sleeve notes for the Please Please Me album, Barrow referred to this very appearance:

"It was during the recording of a Radio Luxembourg programme in the EMI Friday Spectacular series that I was finally convinced that The Beatles were about to enjoy the type of top-flight national fame which I had always believed that they deserved. The teen-audience didn't know the evening's line-up of artists and groups in advance, and before Muriel Young brought on The Beatles she began to read out their Christian names. She got as far as John ... Paul ... and the rest of her introduction was buried in a mighty barrage of very genuine applause. I cannot think of more than one other group - British or American - which would be so readily identified and welcomed by the announcement of two Christian names. To me, this was the ultimate proof that The Beatles (and not just one or two of their hit records) had arrived at the uncommon peak-popularity point reserved for discdom's privileged few. Shortly afterwards The Beatles proved their pop power when the by-passed the lower segments of the hit parade to scuttle straight into the nation's Top Ten with their second single, PLEASE PLEASE ME."

The photo offered here was taken on that momentous January day by Angus McBean and was signed later that year on the reverse side by all four Beatles. Each has written his name legibly and boldly, with Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and John Lennon signing in blue ballpoint pen and George Harrison signing in black. An additional name, presumably that of the original obtainer of the signatures, has been written in the lower left corner, but far removed from the area where The Beatles have signed. This name, if desired, could be professionally removed with no effect on the Beatles' signatures. The photo, which measures 10” x 8”, is in excellent condition for its age, with only a few barely perceptible thumb bends present. The images speak for themselves - this is an exceptional set of autographs.
 
Autographed Beatles photos in any form are becoming increasingly more difficult to obtain. Although this one has been signed on the back, it's a wonderful display piece, an equally prudent investment and a showcase artifact that captures the band at the start of their inevitable ascent to worldwide acclaim…..$14,000

  
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PH4.
Beatles Star Pics Photo By Dezo Hoffmann, Signed By All Four Members Of The Band on September 1, 1963

On Sunday, September 1, 1963, fresh from a six-night concert stint in Southport and concurrent filming for the documentary that would later be broadcast as The Mersey Sound, The Beatles traveled the 32 miles from Liverpool to Manchester's Didsbury Studio Centre. Here, they taped an appearance on ABC Television's  Big Night Out, the variety show hosted by comic brothers Mike and Bernie Winters. In addition to the Boys, the guests included British comedian and dancer Billy Dainty, Australian singer and actress Patsy Ann Noble and British choreographer and dancer Lionel Blair. Show rehearsals took place during the day and the taping commenced that evening on the main stage of Studio One before an audience of 600. The group mimed three songs: From Me To You, She Loves You and Twist and Shout. The show was broadcast six days later, on September 7th, across most of the ITV network.

For your consideration, we present a black and white Star Pics photo -- featuring a classic Dezo Hoffmann image -- signed boldly on the front by all four Beatles on the day of the Big Night Out taping. Each Beatle has signed his name in blue ballpoint pen adjacent to or atop his image. Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr have also added three kisses (XXXs) following their signatures. At the time the autographs were signed, the group was also in the midst of recording their second Parlophone album With The Beatles, which had begun in mid-July and would continue until late October.

This is a stellar set of autographs on one of the iconic Hoffmann collarless suit images that had been widely circulating since the photo session earlier in the year.  American fans are intimately familiar with this shot as it would later appear on the back cover of their first Capitol album, Meet The Beatles.

The photo, which measures 7½” x 6”, is in superb condition with just a few light creases. Fully-signed Dezo Hoffmann photos are among the rarest and, consequently, the most in-demand of all Beatles autographed pieces. His collarless suit photos from the spring of 1963 are considered to be the definitive images of the group, taken at the beginning of their meteoric rise to rise to fame. Opportunities to own autographed Hoffmann images like this one are few and far between....$20,000


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PH1.  THE ULTIMATE SIGNED BEATLES PHOTOGRAPH:
          An Extremely Large, Rare And Desirable Dezo Hoffmann Portrait Of The Beatles - -
          The Most Iconic And Reproduced Beatles Image Of All Time - - Fully Signed By The Group In 1963

In the spring of 1963, in his Wardour Street studios in London, photographer Dezo Hoffmann held a photo session with The Beatles that produced the single most iconic image of the band ever taken: the classic seated collarless suits portrait that was used on countless pieces of memorabilia and sent around the world for publicity purposes. Even Capitol Records used the photo numerous times for the picture covers of its American single and EP releases. The date of the photo session varies. Hoffmann himself claimed that it was taken on May 17, 1963, while The Beatles London book by Mark Lewisohn, Piet Schreuders and Adam Smith states that the session took place three weeks earlier -- between April 22nd and 27th. Regardless of the date, the seated photo remains the most reproduced image of the group ever.

Just a few short months after the photo session, The Beatles made their final three appearances for 1963 at the ABC Theatre in Blackpool -- one on August 11th, one on August 25th and one on September 8th. By this time, the Hoffmann photo was well-known and widely-distributed to both fans and members of the press. During one of these three Blackpool dates, a shop owner whose store was located next door to the theater managed to secure the signatures of all four Beatles on a huge 14-1/2" x 11-1/2" Topstar heavy stock photo print of the classic image.

To say that this signed photo is unusual, rare and desirable is the greatest of understatements. Authentic signed copies of this photo are exceedingly scarce in any size. Even autographed 10” x 8” Hoffmann photos are impossible to find and very seldom surface -- let alone a signed portrait of this unusually large size.

Each of The Beatles has signed by his respective image in blue ballpoint pen. Also, because the photo is oversized, each member of the group has signed his name proportionately larger than would have been signed on a smaller print. The signatures are beautiful, complete and, again, exceptionally large.

This is the ultimate signed Beatles photograph -- arguably the most famous and recognizable shot of The Beatles ever taken. When one considers that the piece features the classic collarless suits pose, in this large size, signed by all four Beatles,  it's easy to understand why it's undeniably one of the finest Beatles autographed photographs in existence.

The photo is in excellent condition and it has been beautifully and expensively framed using the finest archival materials, by Vandeuren Framers in Los Angeles (www.Vandeuren.com). Here is a rare opportunity to make the ultimate signed Beatles photograph your own…..$60,000


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PH3. A Color Magazine Photo Signed By The Beatles


Authentic signed photos of The Beatles are a rare commodity, especially color images like this one. Carefully removed from an early British fan magazine, this photo measures 11 ¾” x 9” and features an image of the group in their light gray collarless suits as photographed by the legendary Dezo Hoffmann in mid-1963. All signatures date from August/September 1963 and each Beatle has signed in blue ballpoint pen above or on his respective image. The page is in good condition, with some scuffing to the maroon photo background, minor creasing and small tape stains in the lower left- and right-hand corners. When you consider that fewer than 20 fully-signed color images of The Beatles have surfaced to date, you begin to grasp the extreme scarcity of this item.....$12,500




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PH2. A Photograph Signed The Day The Beatles Met Elvis

As far back as the late 1950s and their formative days as ‘The Quarrymen’, the members of The Beatles always idolized Elvis Presley. Paul McCartney has said, “Every time I felt low, I just put on an Elvis record and I’d feel great, beautiful.” John Lennon once claimed that “Nothing really affected me until I heard Elvis. If there hadn’t been Elvis, there would not have been The Beatles.” In 1975, Lennon told Tom Snyder (on the “Tomorrow Show”) that when he went to the movies as a teen and saw Elvis up on the screen, he thought to himself “Now that’s a good job”. He also said that the experience of hearing ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ for the first time made his hair stand on end and that Elvis was the only one person in the U.S. the band really wanted to meet. In 1962, before they had achieved any type of real fame, The Beatles decided that they were going to be bigger than Elvis – a declaration also made by manager Brian Epstein when touting The Beatles to British record companies. This was, of course, an incredibly lofty goal considering that Elvis Presley was the biggest star at the time and they were virtual unknowns.

On Friday, August 27, 1965, The Beatles finally had the opportunity to meet their idol. At the time, they were indeed bigger stars than Elvis! On the final leg of their 1965 North American tour, they swung out to California to play San Diego, Los Angeles and San Francisco. While in L.A. for the Hollywood Bowl show, they met Elvis at his home at 565 Perugia Way in posh Bel Air. They were accompanied by Brian Epstein, Neil Aspinall, Mal Evans, Tony Barrow and journalist Chris Hutchins of The New Musical Express. The meeting had been arranged by Elvis’ famous manager “Colonel” Tom Parker.

While a bit awkward at first, Elvis broke the ice by telling the boys: “Look guys, if you’re going to just sit there and stare at me, I’m going to bed.” Everyone laughed and for the next three hours, they had a great time – chatting about songwriting, films, tours, records and cars and also playing roulette and jamming. During the hour-long jam session, Elvis played the bass, John played rhythm guitar, Paul played piano and George played third guitar. Elvis told Ringo, “Too bad we left the drums in Memphis.”

As the gathering was coming to an end, a few members of Elvis’ inner circle obtained The Beatles’ autographs on signed photos. Here is one such photo signed on that historic night – autographed for Elvis’ first cousin Billy Smith, who was quite happy to meet The Beatles. All four have signed beautifully in blue ballpoint pen, with Ringo inscribing “To Billy Best Wishes from the Beatles”. The photo, which features The Beatles holding teacups, was taken by photographer Robert Whittaker and is an outtake shot from the session that produced the “Beatles ‘65” album cover. The photograph measures 6 ½” x 8 ½” and is in near perfect condition, having been very well kept over the years. This item comes with a signed statement from Billy Smith stating that he personally obtained the autographs on that day.

Unfortunately, no recordings from that night exist and the only known photos were taken outside as The Beatles left Elvis’ home. This spectacular signed piece places you inside Elvis’ Bel Air mansion, serving as one of the very few tangible pieces of a truly momentous occasion – the legendary meeting of the greatest icons in rock ‘n roll history. It is undeniably the ultimate prize for any Beatles and Elvis fan!.....$25,000




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